Jaimie Timmons

Over the course of nearly 20 years at the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), Jaimie has had leadership roles in projects related to state systems and organizational change, Community Life Engagement, and transition for individuals with Intellectual and/or Developmental Disabilities (IDD) and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Jaimie has administered dozens of local, regional, and national projects involving project staffing, managing subcontracts, work plan creation and adherence, research protections, and budgeting, while collaborating with both internal and external researchers and others. Jaimie held the role of Project Director on a three-year Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s Autism Intervention Grant, testing the impact of community service on transition age youth with ASD. In addition, Jaimie acted as PI for a project evaluating a college-based transition program for young adults with ASD located at the University of South Florida, Tampa. Jaimie is also Project Director of ICIs ACL-funded Access to Integrated Employment Project, a twenty-year Project of National Significance collecting data on employment services and outcomes for individuals with IDD. She also acts as PI on a line of research related to organizational transformation of agencies seeking to close their sheltered workshops as part of ICI’s Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Jaimie's research interests stem from her background providing direct services to families with children with special health care needs and ASD. 

State Employment First Policies #3: Investing in Training and Technical Assistance to Build Capacity in Integrated Employment

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This brief is the third in a series focusing on Employment First implementation as it relates to one of the seven elements within the High-Performing States in Integrated Employment model. As states undergo implementation of their policies, it is important to understand how state agencies have built employment knowledge and capacity.

State Employment First Policies #2: Engaging Stakeholders in Development and Implementation

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This brief is the second in a series focusing on Employment First implementation as it relates to one of the seven elements within the High-Performing States in Integrated Employment model. It looks at the interagency collaboration and partnership element in depth. Interagency partnership and collaboration includes interagency agreements and relationships, provider collaboration, and outreach to stakeholders to ensure that integrated employment is a shared goal.

Building an Evidence-Based, Holistic Approach to Advancing Integrated Employment

Since the introduction of supported employment in the Developmental Disabilities Act of 1984 and the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1986, there has been continued development and refinement of best practices in employment services and supports. Progress includes creative outcomes for individuals with significant support needs including customized jobs and self-employment, community rehabilitation providers that have shifted emphasis to integrated employment, and states that have made a substantial investment in Employment First policy and strategy.

Considering Community Service: Building Social Skills for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Introduction

Limited employment outcomes of young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a recent surge in incidence of ASD diagnosis indicate a need for more effective school-to-work transition interventions. Community service opportunities can support young adults with ASD to gain skills, explore careers, and develop networks that can lead to meaningful employment.

Considering Community Service: Building Self-Determination Skills for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Introduction

Limited employment outcomes of young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a recent surge in incidence of ASD diagnosis indicate a need for more effective school-to-work transition interventions. Community service opportunities can support young adults with ASD to gain skills, explore careers, and develop networks that can lead to meaningful employment.

Considering Community Service: Career Development for Youth With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Introduction

Limited employment outcomes of young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and a recent surge in incidence of ASD diagnosis indicate a need for more effective school-to-work transition interventions. Community service opportunities can support young adults with ASD to gain skills, explore careers, and develop networks that can lead to meaningful employment.

Lessons Learned from the Learning Academy: Optimizing Transition Supports for Young Adults with Autism

The Learning Academy (TLA) at the University of South Florida is a 30-week transition program for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) between the ages of 18 and 25. The program provides services, supports, and experiential opportunities, with the aim of enhancing skills that will prepare students to succeed in the workplace and postsecondary education settings.