Families

Parents and siblings provide a variety of supports for their family members with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Learn more about how these families give and get support, including how cultural background plays in, and how provider agencies can work with family members.

Research Study Flyer - Join the Family LifeCourse Group!

Download the flyer here...

  1. Are you the parent or guardian of youth/young adult between the ages of 12 and 18 who has an intellectual/developmental disability (IDD)?
  2. Do you check your Facebook account at least weekly?
  3. Do you wonder about the future for your youth/young adult including employment and daily living? Are you interested in learning how to take steps to make your vision a reality?

If so, the Family Life Course Group might be for you!

Families and Employment of People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Results from a Scoping Study

Download the article here. Purpose: Recent policy changes expanding community employment for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (IDD) and awareness of the important role of family members as facilitators of these opportunities motivated this scoping review of the literature on family engagement with the IDD service system.

Beyond Training: Engaging Families in the Transition to Employment

Read the brief here. We conducted an extended search of trainings provided by state agencies and service providers that are targeted towards families. Trainings in the form of written material (handbooks, brochures and computer-based courses) or given in person by service professionals, peers and others have been found to raise expectations that family members with IDD can become employed in their communities.

Engaging Families Effectively: Results From a Forums and Facebook Group Qualitative Research Study

Attendees learned how families have modeled employment and advocated for their children to have early work experiences similar to those of their peers without disabilities. Attendees heard how the service system and families have tried to engage across language barriers and socioeconomic differences.

Partnerships in Employment: Engaging Families of Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Systems Change Efforts

Youth with intellectual disabilities often face challenges when preparing to leave school settings to move into life in their communities. These young adults may experience high rates of unemployment, increased rates of poverty, and involvement in service systems that do not have the resources needed to provide quality services for all who need them.

44 Series - Does All Mean All? Culturally Diverse Families and Access to Services

Watch the archived webinar here...Researchers Judith Gross (University of Kansas) and Grace Francis (George Mason University) work intensively with Hispanic families in rural Kansas. They talked about the importance of engaging culturally and linguistically diverse families in services for their children with IDD. Judith and Grace discussed the barriers these families face, and offered strategies for professionals to help ensure full access to services.

Engaging Individuals and Families in Conversations Around Employment

Family engagement is key to successful employment and life planning, with parents and siblings often leading their family members with disabilities on the path to employment through their own role modeling and encouragement. Despite what literature says about the true importance of family engagement, many parents lack the knowledge needed to meaningfully participate in employment planning. One critical gap is thinking about financial well-being for their family member with a disability.

The Influential Role of the Job Developer: Increasing Self-Determination and Family Involvement Through the Job Search

Job developers can influence decision-making during the job search and placement process. For a study exploring the employment decisions of people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD), researchers interviewed 16 individuals with IDD, their family members, and professionals involved in their job search. Participants were asked what factors, circumstances, or people affected their decisions about work. The job developer was consistently named the most influential person in the job-search process.